Northern Ireland

Conor McGregor calls Northern Ireland rapper sectarian insult

MMA star Conor McGregor has been criticised after making sectarian comments online towards a Northern Ireland rapper.
MMA star Conor McGregor has been criticised after making sectarian comments online towards a Northern Ireland rapper. MMA star Conor McGregor has been criticised after making sectarian comments online towards a Northern Ireland rapper.

A Northern Ireland rapper has criticised Conor McGregor for using sectarian language after trading insults online.

Scott Moore, a former Alliance party activist and council candidate from Strabane who raps under the name of Scomo, posted videos of a ‘battle rap’ between the two.

Retired UFC champion McGregor, who is now promoting himself as “the next President of Ireland” then posted a video telling Moore: “You’re a little orange c*** from across the border. F*** off mate, you know what I’m saying."

The feud had started after Mr Moore called McGregor “a profoundly stupid person” over his comments about the Irish Presidency.

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This includes a recent campaign pledge, that if “anointed” as President he would appoint a new Taoiseach “with a friendly sparring match in my purpose built, President’s Octagon…if you cannot spar a friendly spar with your President you should not lead the country”.

McGregor’s response to Mr Moore was to post voice clips of him rapping insults about a mental health condition that causes him to pick at his skin.

GAA pundit Joe Brolly has also accused Conor McGregor of bullying for his online comments directed at Scott Moore.
GAA pundit Joe Brolly has also accused Conor McGregor of bullying for his online comments directed at Scott Moore. GAA pundit Joe Brolly has also accused Conor McGregor of bullying for his online comments directed at Scott Moore.

Speaking to the Irish News, Mr Moore (25) said that he had managed to flip the tables on what could have been intimidating for many people.

“It’s a great opportunity to hold Conor McGregor to account,” he said.

“For somebody like me, who he thought he could pick on, to actually stand up to him and the turn the tables.

“He’s somebody with power, with lots of money and fame. But what I’ve done through my artform of battle rap is to make it so that I have the power.”

He also said that McGregor had yet to respond to a challenge to ‘get in the ring’ for a battle rap in person.

“He has all this money and fame and yet he’s hiding away in his gold palace and not man enough to face me in front of a crowd for all to see.

“I asked him to name a location and he blocked me and deleted all the tweets. This is someone that is very rattled indeed from someone who described me as spotty, scabby. Is he scared to be beaten by what he called ‘a mentally disabled weakling?’”

Adding that the encounter has done his music career no harm, he said the audio clips of the exchange have now been viewed thousands of times on the Premier Battles YouTube channel.

Posting in support of Moore was the barrister and GAA pundit Joe Brolly, who called the exchange “terrible cruelty and bullying of a vulnerable person.”

This month, Brolly has already said that his lawyers are examining social media posts from McGregor about him.

It followed posts after the Dublin stabbing in which three children and an adult were injured.

A bus on fire on O’Connell Street in Dublin city centre after violent scenes unfolded following an attack in Parnell Square East (Brian Lawless/PA)
A bus on fire on O’Connell Street in Dublin city centre after violent scenes unfolded following an attack in Parnell Square East (Brian Lawless/PA) A bus on fire on O’Connell Street in Dublin city centre after violent scenes unfolded following an attack in Parnell Square East (Brian Lawless/PA)

Mr Brolly later stated: "My lawyers are examining tweets about me from an individual."

Although not naming McGregor, he said: "These include incitement to hatred, violence and defamation."

Having recently announced the birth of his fourth child, McGregor’s posts about the rioting are being examined by police as part of probes into suspected incitement to hatred on social media.

Calling for a “plan of action” from the Irish government over public safety, he said: “If they do not act soon to ensure Ireland’s safety, I will.”

He also denied he condoned the riots after being accused of stirring up tensions.