Northern Ireland

Hume summit to examine way forward for reconciliation

Next week's peace summit has been organised by the John and Pat Hume Foundation which was established to nurture the legacy of the Nobel Peace Laureate and his late wife, Pat.
Next week's peace summit has been organised by the John and Pat Hume Foundation which was established to nurture the legacy of the Nobel Peace Laureate and his late wife, Pat. Next week's peace summit has been organised by the John and Pat Hume Foundation which was established to nurture the legacy of the Nobel Peace Laureate and his late wife, Pat.

MORE than 100 people from across Ireland are expected to take part in a major peace summit examining the “unfinished business” of reconciliation and the Good Friday Agreement.

Organised by the John and Pat Hume Foundation along with other organisations, the “Unfinished Business of Reconciliation” takes place in Derry next week in advance of the 25th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement.

The Hume Foundation was established to nurture the legacy of the work of the late Nobel laureate and former SDLP leader, Mr Hume and his late wife, Pat.

Foundation secretary, Tim Attwood said more than 100 people were expected to attend the summit at Ulster University’s Magee Campus next Friday, March 3.

Mr Attwood said the conference would consider how a new generation of peace builders could be better supported.

In preparation for the summit, the Glencree Centre for Peace and Reconciliation, Youth Action NI, the Hollywell Trust, UU’s Internal Conflict Unit and the Integrated Education Fund have been working with young people. The project is exploring recommendations for a peace summit report to be presented at next week’s event.

“John and Pat Hume dedicated their lives to ending violence and building a peace based on partnership, dialogue and respect for diversity and these were the foundations upon which the historic agreement of 1998 was built,” Mr Attwood said.

While the last 25 years have brought “relative peace”, it should not be taken for granted.

“The peace summit will take a stock check on the unfinished business of peace and reconciliation in Northern Ireland, recognising the achievements and produce important recommendations for the way forward for the next 25 years,” Mr Attwood said.

Community Dialogue’s Dympna McGlade said young people were concerned that the peace process might not deliver for future generations.