Soccer

Mikel Arteta benefits from new law changes as Arsenal clinch Community Shield

Leandro Trossard’s equaliser sent the match to a shootout (John Walton/PA)
Leandro Trossard’s equaliser sent the match to a shootout (John Walton/PA) Leandro Trossard’s equaliser sent the match to a shootout (John Walton/PA)

Mikel Arteta was the first victim and the first beneficiary of the new law changes after Arsenal won the Community Shield 4-1 on penalties after a 1-1 draw against Manchester City.

Gunners boss Arteta was booked in the first half by referee Stuart Attwell for protesting against a decision, part of the new clampdown on the touchline behaviour of managers.

But the fiery Spaniard was celebrating after the new law on timewasting and keeping the ball in play – meaning extended periods of stoppage time – allowed his side to equalise with 101 minutes on the clock.

“It is really good to do that,” he said. “It was going too far and now teams are going to have to think twice. We have to prepare to play 100 minutes. It is going to happen every single week.”

On his yellow card, Arteta added: “I cannot change my behaviour in three days and I can’t say tomorrow that we play with no offsides and what is the linesman doing? I try my best.”

Pep Guardiola felt the amount of stoppage time was excessive even before the initial eight minutes stretched to 13 after a clash of heads between Kyle Walker and Thomas Partey.

City’s treble-winning boss now also expects matches to regularly extend to 100 minutes and even longer.

“We have to get used to it,” he said. “I had the feeling, not because we were winning 1-0, but that not much happened to extend it for eight minutes.

“It’s a good question for the international board and people because they don’t consult with managers and players and we have to accept it with this amount of games.

“Now the games will be 100 minutes. Nothing happened today and there was eight minutes. They extend for goals.

“If the score is 4-3, you put 45 seconds on for seven goals, tomorrow morning I am (still) here playing.”

Young forward Cole Palmer, who was on as a substitute for the quiet Erling Haaland, appeared to have won it for City in normal time after a fine curling finish.

Martin Odegaard (centre) and Arsenal team-mates lift the trophy after the FA Community Shield
Martin Odegaard (centre) and Arsenal team-mates lift the trophy after the FA Community Shield Arsenal lifted the trophy after a 4-1 win on penalties at Wembley (Nick Potts/PA)

But Leandro Trossard’s shot deflected in – off Manuel Akanji – to earn Arsenal a 1-1 draw and take the game to a penalty shoot-out.

The Gunners scored all four of their spot-kicks, while Kevin De Bruyne fired against the crossbar and Rodri’s weak effort was saved by Aaron Ramsdale.

Fabio Vieira stepped up to hit the final penalty with Arsenal winning the shootout 4-1 to land the first piece of silverware of the campaign and go some way to lifting a mental block after last season’s disappointment at losing the title to City.

Leandro Trossard celebrates for Arsenal
Leandro Trossard celebrates for Arsenal Leandro Trossard’s equaliser sent the match to a shootout (John Walton/PA)

“It feels great. I don’t think it gets much better than winning a trophy at Wembley against the best team in the world, and especially the way we have done it,” added Arteta.

“It’s great if the players are convinced they can beat every team. I think we showed a real determination and fight to win the game.

“The reason why we are here to win trophies for this club and make it successful. I have seen so many happy and proud people.”

City lost last year’s Community Shield to Liverpool and although they did not do too badly over the rest of the season, Guardiola was still irritated by the defeat.

“(We’ve lost) three in a row,” he added. “We came here to win it. We were so close, but winning or losing, I know the position of the team.

“We would love to win today but sometimes you have to accept that.”