UK

Gin made with botanicals from Palace of Holyroodhouse launched

The Royal Collection Trust has launched a dry gin using botanicals from the gardens of the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

A dry gin infused with botanicals grown in the gardens at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh has become the latest spirit to be launched by the Royal Collection Trust (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)
The gin A dry gin infused with botanicals grown in the gardens at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh has become the latest spirit to be launched by the Royal Collection Trust (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)

A dry gin infused with botanicals grown in the gardens at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh has become the latest spirit to be launched by the Royal Collection Trust.

Each gin is flavoured with ingredients sourced from the grounds of the Official Royal Residences.

The Palace of Holyroodhouse Dry Gin is infused with mint and lemon thyme hand-picked from the palace’s Physic Garden.

The Physic Garden in the grounds of the Palace of Holyroodhouse opened in 2020 (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)
The Physic Garden in the grounds of the Palace of Holyroodhouse opened in 2020 (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024) The Physic Garden in the grounds of the Palace of Holyroodhouse opened in 2020 (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)

Inspired by the garden’s history of cultivating medicinal and culinary herbs, the botanicals – which are steeped for 24 hours before the distilling process begins – combine with juniper to create a delicately fragrant gin with a complex citrus top note.

The Physic Garden was opened adjacent to the palace in 2020 to recreate the earliest known gardens on the site.

It can be freely enjoyed year round by the people of Edinburgh and visitors to the Palace.

Originally founded in the grounds of the palace in 1670 by two Scottish physicians, Sir Robert Sibbald and Sir Andrew Balfour, it provided fresh ingredients for pharmacists and allowed students to learn the medicinal properties of plants.

The bottle design is inspired by inspired by the 17th-century Scottish textiles seen on the bed in Mary, Queen of Scots’ Bedchamber inside the Palace (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)
The bottle design is inspired by inspired by the 17th-century Scottish textiles seen on the bed in Mary, Queen of Scots’ Bedchamber inside the Palace (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024) The bottle design is inspired by inspired by the 17th-century Scottish textiles seen on the bed in Mary, Queen of Scots’ Bedchamber inside the Palace (Royal Collection Trust/His Majesty King Charles III 2024)

It was the first garden of its kind in Scotland and was the forerunner of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh.

Today, visitors to the Physic Garden will see plants such as fennel, lavender, and lemon balm growing as well as a meadow of wildflowers with healing properties.

The floral bottle design of the gin is inspired by the 17th century Scottish textiles seen on the bed in Mary, Queen of Scots’ bedchamber inside the palace.

All profits from sales of the gin go towards the care of, and access to, the Royal Collection through the public opening of the Royal Residences, exhibitions, loans, and educational programmes managed by Royal Collection Trust, a registered charity.