Northern Ireland

Shane MacGowan was no stranger to the stage in Belfast

Shane MacGowan in action at Belfast's Beechmount Leisure Centre in 1998
Shane MacGowan in action at Belfast's Beechmount Leisure Centre in 1998 Shane MacGowan in action at Belfast's Beechmount Leisure Centre in 1998

Shane MacGowan was no stranger to the stage in Belfast, performing numerous times in the city over the course of his successful music career.

An appearance by the legendary Pogues at a festive gig at St George’s Market in 2009 was among one of the last times MacGowan performed in Belfast.

Fronting the Irish folk/punk band, which was formed in 1982, they kicked off the yuletide festivities with a concert at the famous city market.

Just two years before that fans of the band were also able to see MacGowan play at the King's Hall in Belfast.

The band had originally been due to perform at the Nugent Hall, but moved the gig to the bigger venue for the pre-Christmas concert in December 2007.

The show also marked the band's 25th anniversary.

Read more:

  • Shane MacGowan: 'The voice of London for us Irish'
  • A Fairytale of how The Pogues frontman Shane Mac Gowan and Kirsty MacColl created a Christmas classic
  • Fairytale Of New York tops chart of most-played Christmas songs

Other notable gigs in the city include a concert by MacGowan at the Beechmount Leisure Centre in 1998 as well as appearing on the decks in the Menagerie Bar in 2004.

Read more:

  • Shane MacGowan has died aged 65
  • Hard-drinking poet/singer Shane MacGowan hit creative highs in The Pogues

He joined Irish DJ BP Fallon for the 'Death Disco' club night.

The musician also showcased his DJ skills at Belfast's Front Page bar in 2003.

Irish News journalist David Roy was among those in the audience at the performance.

Speaking at the time, David recalled how MacGowan was late taking the stage and was "greeted warmly and enthusiastically by the audience".

But he said that after around 20 minutes a member of the audience picked up a large bottle and threw it at the musician.

The attacker was set upon by the audience, but fled.

He also recalled how the audience turned on the attacker a second time when he returned.

But throughout it all, David said, MacGowan seemed to "take it all in his stride".