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Dropping Paltrow lawsuit would provide ‘cure’ for plaintiff, court told

The ‘national recognition’ of the trial was likely to bring ‘a lot of anxiety’ to Terry Sanderson and would slow his recovery, jurors heard.
The ‘national recognition’ of the trial was likely to bring ‘a lot of anxiety’ to Terry Sanderson and would slow his recovery, jurors heard. The ‘national recognition’ of the trial was likely to bring ‘a lot of anxiety’ to Terry Sanderson and would slow his recovery, jurors heard.

Dropping the high-profile ski crash lawsuit against Gwyneth Paltrow would provide a “cure” for a man who claims he suffered significant health problems following the incident, a US court has heard.

The “national recognition” of the trial was likely to bring “a lot of anxiety” to Terry Sanderson and would slow his recovery, jurors were told.

Mr Sanderson, a retired optometrist, is suing the Oscar-winning actress over the collision in 2016, in which he suffered several broken ribs and a brain injury.

Ms Paltrow has denied the claims, alleging that Mr Sanderson crashed into her at the Deer Valley resort in Utah, and caused her to lose “half a day of skiing”.

On Wednesday, the court heard from several medical experts, who discussed Mr Sanderson’s declining health following the incident.

Neurologist Dr Robert Hoesch said the “mild event” that had occurred seven years prior was not “causing all the problems” that Mr Sanderson was now suffering from.

“My job is to help the patient and family gain acceptance that this mild event seven years ago isn’t causing all these problems that he’s having now,” he said.

Gwyneth Paltrow Skiing Lawsuit
Gwyneth Paltrow Skiing Lawsuit The ‘national recognition’ of the trial was likely to bring ‘a lot of anxiety’ to Terry Sanderson and would slow his recovery, jurors were told (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, Pool)

Asked by Stephen Owens, representing Ms Paltrow, if the “cure” for Mr Sanderson was the end of the lawsuit, Dr Hoesch replied: “Correct.”

“Suing somebody, going through a trial, a trial that has national recognition, can bring on a lot of anxiety and if you’re prone to that, it’s going to make it worse and it’s going to slow your recovery,” he said.

Beginning his questioning, Mr Owens twice referred to Dr Hoesch as “a nerd”, though he later clarified that he was “kidding”.

Neuropsychologist Dr Angela Eastvold later said Mr Sanderson did not show any signs he suffered from a “significant” concussion, noting he had shown no signs of attention deficit in tests taken after the incident.

Gwyneth Paltrow Skiing Lawsuit
Gwyneth Paltrow Skiing Lawsuit Gwyneth Paltrow says that Mr Sanderson crashed into her at the Deer Valley resort in Utah (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

She also noted that Mr Sanderson had reported increased alcohol consumption, which was not typical of those suffering from concussion.

Mr Sanderson gave evidence in the trial on Monday, telling the court he had become a “self-imposed recluse” following the incident.

In her own testimony, Ms Paltrow said that she was “very sorry” for Mr Sanderson, but reiterated that she was not “at fault” for his subsequent health decline.

Closing arguments in the trial, taking place in Park City, Utah, are expected to take place on Thursday.