Entertainment

Scottish Album of the Year Award goes online despite ‘industry in crisis'

Music fans have been invited to make submissions before Friday July 31 for the £20,000 prize.

The Scottish Album of the Year (SAY) Award will be hosted online for the first time despite fears the country’s music industry is “in crisis”.

Live announcements held in the previous nine years will be replaced by virtual events including the final award ceremony later in 2020.

Music fans have been invited to make submissions – of eligible Scottish albums released between April 1 2019 and May 31 2020 – on the SAY Award website before Friday July 31 for the £20,000 prize.

Gerry Cinnamon at TRNSMT
Gerry Cinnamon performing on the main stage during TRNSMT (Andrew Milligan/PA)

Auntie Flo was named last year’s winner for Radio Highlife while other acts on the eventual shortlist included Aidan Moffat and RM Hubbert, Kathryn Joseph and Mastersystem.

Eligible acts which can be submitted for the 2020 award include Lewis Capaldi, Gerry Cinnamon, Declan Welsh and the Decadent West, Anna Meredith, Twin Atlantic, Siobhan Wilson and Idlewild among others.

The move online comes in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, with Scottish music venues among the industries forced to close their doors over the last few months during lockdown.

In the route map out of lockdown the Scottish Government has said they expect mass gatherings “will not be permitted for some time” but are included in phase four and will be subject to public health advice.

Robert Kilpatrick, general manager of the Scottish Music Industry Association (SMIA), said: “Scotland’s music industry is in crisis. For many of my industry colleagues, celebrating may be the last thing they’ll feel like doing.

“How can we celebrate when venues have closed, are closing and will continue to close unless something more is done? When our young people are losing access to music? How do our young people become future talent, active fans and economic supporters of our industry?

“There are no easy answers and as the situation continues Scotland’s music industry remains at significant risk, with a strong reliance on people coming together to create or experience music, as well as a high level of self-employment.

“Never more than now is it important we celebrate Scottish music.

“By celebrating, we promote its visibility, highlight its value, develop audiences and stimulate opportunity at a time it’s never been needed more.

“The SAY Award campaign has been reimagined for 2020 and has been designed to help mitigate some of the key challenges our industry faces. We hope you join us and best of luck to all eligible albums.”

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