More Letters to the Editor news

Unionist revisionism

There is a recurring revisionist narrative from people like Kate Hoey and Jim Allister that would portray government in the six counties up until direct rule as fair and democratic.

A man for all seasons

Politically I didn’t like or dislike David Trimble.  He was a person with a detached persona. He had a political vision linked to the unconventionality of his political intelligence and imagination.

Lifeline for political unionism

In the wake of the latest failure to persuade the DUP to do their job, or at least allow others to do theirs, DUP scripts had started to fray at the edges.

No alternative to violence?

Should we in the unionist community feel some sympathy for Michelle O’Neill who said, in an interview last week, that “at that time there was no alternative” to IRA members using violence?

DUP being allowed to scatter Good Friday Agreement to the winds

Micheál Martin, Leo Varadkar and the rag-tag group of meaningless individuals that constitute the incumbent Free State government should hang their heads in abject shame at the way in which they have allowed the Good Friday Agreement (GFA) to be scattered to the winds by the DUP and the British government.

Social decay has reached rock bottom

Today we can watch the activities of people around the world, some good, some funny, but mostly it is horror that catches people’s attention, and the recent online video of the actions of children on the Glider bus in Belfast falls squarely into the category.

Taoiseach leading Ireland towards slippery slope of joining Nato

The BBC really does have people’s interests at heart because undue pressure must have been applied to try to stop the showing of the investigative Panorama programme which was produced and directed by Hannah O’Grady – ‘SAS Death Squads Exposed: a British War Crime’ (July 12) – outlining the many instances of cold-blooded killings carried out by ‘special forces’ operatives in the war in Afghanistan (2001-2021) before the Taliban, mounted on scooters and tractors, kicked them out. 

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It seems 30 years of Ukrainian independence hasn’t achieved much

Volodymyr Zelensky, since his election, favours the western section of Ukraine, as they were the only sector to vote in the last election. The US organised coup of 2014 triggered a chain reaction in Ukraine; the Eastern regions, as well as Crimea, refused to recognise this new government as legitimate, and they opposed the coup and the coming to power of right-wing nationalists. In Kiev, Aleksandor Turchynov became temporary president, approved by Jeffrey Pyatt, US ambassador. On April 12 2014, John Brennan, director of the CIA, arrives in Kiev – officially there to expand cooperaton in the field of security. On the same day, the Nazi organisation, Right Sector, announced the armed mobilisation of its supporters for an operation in the Donbass. On April 14, Aleksandor Turchynov, as chairman of the Rada, signed a decree no 4052014, to start the anti-terrorist operation against the Donbass, which continued to this day, until Russia intervened by recognising these regions as autonomous states. President Zelensky resolved the national issue July 1 2021, concerning the indigenous people of Ukraine, by signing into law a nearly identical copy of the Reich’s 1935 Citizens Law, in Hitler’s Germany. According to this law, the second largest peoples of Ukraine, Russians, are now considered second-class, with Zelensky advising anyone who considers themselves Russian, to leave Ukraine. It seems that 30 years of independence has not achieved much, apart from being poorly advised by the US, the UK, and the EU, who most certainly have no interest in the Ukranian people, except for its strategic location next to Russia, otherwise any improvements to its economy would have taken place decades ago. The electorate have made poor choices of prime ministers and presidents, some who seem more interested in filling their own pockets than helping Ukraine get out of this mess. If assimilation is impossible, then partition must be the only other answer,. There is no future in continued intractability on both sides, brought about by Kiev not addressing the original concerns of the Donetsk and Lughansk regions in a professional way in 2014 – instead, treating them as separatists and terrorists, and using unnecessary military force, which included the Azov battalions, to subdue them. Ukraine is split irreconcilably, far too late to repair and much too much blood spilt. From now on, get used to eastern/western Ukraine with a border and you can thank the US for this disaster.

 EDWARD MURPHY

Ballycastle, Co Antrim

 

 

Nothing

‘glorious’ to be

remembered

from our brief

internecine

slaughter

T

 here was a recent TV series called Sherwood about a deluded killer in a small community riven with the aftermath of the miners’ strike during the Thatcher era.

It was a family against family drama of vivid bitterness which never went away after people took different sides and views during that strike.

Name calling over garden walls and in the street and pubs, with long ago slights resurrected on a daily basis and fights breaking out at a moment’s notice. Everyone felt justified in their stance.

It reminded me of our own civil war consequences when the same hatred remained for decades – and which is feebly resurrected from time to time by modern IRA offshoots and their propaganda machine.

When I was a schoolchild in the 1950s we were described and alluded to by parents through which side a family had taken during that madness of the local gang wars, which is what that nasty war was, essentially.

I feel appalled today that there is credence given that after 100 years of pointless murder and mayhem that disgusting Treaty/Anti-Treaty forces piled against each other; ought to be marked and commemorated with pride. It makes no common sense, when there is only so much pain and loss to recall at the hands of Irish against Irish killing.

On a personal level I know that my grandfather, who was an officer in the War of Independence, stood with the IRA in the civil war and his brother took the legitimate government military side. They never spoke to each other for the rest of their lives.

My father and his brothers also took the IRA side, only to be also defeated. Three of them emigrated to Canada for many years and two uncles lie buried there, far from home. There was/is nothing “glorious” to be remembered from our brief and internecine slaughter – only a lingering grief.

It also made us as children nervous and confused in certain ways which was never a healthy life lesson.

Forget this now, and begin with not bringing to the surface a period we should all be ashamed of, please.

ROBERT SULLIVAN

Bantry, Co Cork

 

 

No wonder

confidence in

PSNI is in

steady decline

It is no wonder that the confidence of the nationalist community in the PSNI is on a steady and irrevocable decline.

It has failed to address failings in its dealings with nationalists, with reports of stop and search being used disproportionately against that community, and if things were not bad enough, the disturbing alleged behaviour of two PSNI officers regarding a young suicide victim.

Then we have the Police Federation, whose main purpose seems to be the defence of the discredited RUC. Maybe a Patton 2 should be considered for the PSNI as it has failed to deliver as  an unbiased servant of the entire population whoever and whatever they may be.

 

DÓNAL MAC AN BHÁIRD

Belfast BT11

 

 

Boris’s latest

appointment

will surely lift

DUP spirits

It is apparent that the Conservative government has a list of members considered below borderline competency and are thereby a perfect fit for the grandiose position as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland. The contempt with which this government holds this so-called part of the UK knows no bounds. The hapless short-term Theresa May appointed Karen Bradley, a politician by rote, who did not even understand the voting patterns of this state, and to date qualifies as the worst secretary – ever.

I say to date, for Boris, still conning the DUP, has appointed Shailesh Vara to replace Brandon Lewis. This appointment will surely lift the flagging spirits of the DUP and the unionist electorate.

How could a man, reputed to ask an official whether he needed a passport to go to Derry, fail? How indeed.

 

WILSON BURGESS

Derry City