Letters to the Editor

Catholic schools not the root cause of conflict in Northern Ireland

Actor Jamie Dornan went to an integrated school

Reading the article in The Irish News – ‘Dornan: I was lucky to go to an integrated school’ (November 6) – I am in no doubt that Jamie Dornan, a celebrity with VIP superiority, gives a great boost of encouragement to the advocates for integrated education.

However, all due respects to Jamie Dornan, but I find it amazing that having lived all his life in a Protestant state for Protestant people, he was totally unaware of the complete oppression of the Catholic people, including everyday suffering in lack of employment and housing.

Whereas, my personal experience of integrated education gave me a very clear experience of that oppression, Jamie does not seem to have grown up with the same sort of awareness or experience.

Nevertheless, to achieve their pro-British aims and ambitions, the advocates for integrated education want to keep us locked up in a regime that took our country.

And in order to maintain and strengthen what Britain achieved here through the centuries – conveniently assuming it is the existence of our Catholic schools that are the root cause of the conflict and discord here.

The advocates for integrated education want our schools done away with, to drive them underground – remember Stephen Farry, Alliance Party, wanted the closure of St Mary’s training college.

Indeed too, it appears that Danny Tracy (November 10), is anti-religion in all directions, trying to eliminate God.

God is now here – the kingdom of God is close at hand.

So, I say – hands off our Catholic schools.

C HUGHES
Belfast BT7

 

Argument that vaccine passports are needed to control virus has no basis in science

The absurd decision to make vaccine passports mandatory here is in direct contravention of Section 7.3.2 of Council of Europe Resolution 2361, which clearly says that member states should “ensure that no-one is discriminated against for not having been vaccinated, due to possible health risks or not wanting to be vaccinated”.

The argument that vaccine passports are needed to control the spread of disease has no basis in science. As the vaccine manufacturers freely admit, none of the Covid vaccines stop infection or transmission. Fully vaccinated people can still become infected and transmit the disease.    

To confirm beyond doubt that vaccine passports have no positive affect on disease control, we only have to compare the Republic with Sweden. The Swedes are completely back to normal with zero restrictions. Everywhere is fully open and there are no mask or vaccine passport mandates. Yet Sweden has virtually no Covid problem. However, in the Republic, where there are strict mask and vaccine passport rules, the Covid problem is dramatically worse.   

While the Irish Republic is getting ready for yet another lockdown, the Swedes are getting ready for the Christmas party season. So if vaccine passports have clearly not worked in the Republic and if Sweden can do far better without them, why are they being introduced here?

Vaccine passports are a way of blackmailing people into taking the Covid vaccine. No-one should ever be coerced into accepting a medication that he/she may not otherwise have taken. The principle of free and fully informed consent is the bedrock of medical ethics. If we diverge from this concept, we are heading down a very dark road indeed.      

PETER McGINNITY
Veterinary surgeon,
Derrynoose, Co Armagh

 

Early diagnosis is vital for survival

Last Thursday (November 18) was World Pancreatic Cancer Day. I’m writing to highlight the importance of learning the symptoms of this devastating disease.

Worryingly, Pancreatic Cancer UK’s new survey tells us that nearly a third of people would wait three months or more to seek help from their GP if they had potential symptoms.

The findings also show that the pandemic is actively deterring people from contacting their doctor, with 31 per cent saying they would delay seeking help for longer than usual. Pancreatic cancer symptoms – which can include tummy and back pain, indigestion. unexplained weight loss and oily floating poo – are common to less serious health conditions and, tragically many people are diagnosed too late for lifesaving treatment.

In Northern Ireland, 266 people are diagnosed with the disease each year.

I would urge anyone who experiences some, or all, of these symptoms persistently for more than four weeks to contact their GP. Early diagnosis is vital to give people the very best chance of survival.

Our specialist nurses provide support and information to anyone affected by pancreatic cancer on our confidential support line on (Freecall: 0808 801 0707).

DIANNE DOBSON
Pancreatic Cancer UK

 

Time for an all-Ireland unity party

It is quite clear to me that the British government is using whatever means possible to divert attention from its appalling record in government be it the ‘protocol’ or it’s handling of the Covid crisis and the countless deaths of thousands of lives that could have been saved. With that said, I believe it is time for an all-Ireland unity poll – and I am no Sinn Féin supporter – so we, the Irish citizens, can decide when we are united as a people with one sovereign government which alliance we want to be a part of.  Just to be clear. I hope for a non-alinged nation free from all outside control.

PAUL DORAN
Dublin 22

 

Sinn Féin needs to deal with denial

IF Mary Lou McDonald intends is to appeal to people like me, the triumphal display at the party’s Ard Fheis by her and Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill was a failure. Until Sinn Féin deals with denial, its cause has no credibility. In the recent Troubles, Sinn Féin associates were responsible for 1,705 casualties (figures from the University of Ulster), and this happened when my community were the majority – what hope when we are the minority.

JOE KYLE
Cullybackey, Co Antrim

Enjoy reading the Irish News?

Subscribe now to get full access

Topics

Letters to the Editor