Northern Ireland

Animation created urging students to understand dangers of online gaming and gambling apps

The digital initiative IS from Ulster University, the Consumer Council and Danske Bank
The digital initiative IS from Ulster University, the Consumer Council and Danske Bank

AN animation has been created to urge students to understand the dangers of online gaming and gambling apps.

The digital initiative from Ulster University, the Consumer Council and Danske Bank illustrates risks attached to online gambling and the serious long-term impact if students do not take preventative measures.

It also explains the dangers that can have an impact on student wellbeing, loss of money, addiction and scams.

The animation and posters will be displayed in universities and college campuses throughout Northern Ireland as well as across different online student portals to raise awareness of the risks and dangers of online gaming and gambling.

Students that have concerns are also being encouraged to reach out to their university, college, or support organisations, for help.

This initiative is also endorsed and supported by GamCare, which provides information, advice and support for anyone affected by gambling harms.

Claire Drummond from Ulster University said: "As the cost-of-living crisis continues to put a strain on student’s finances it is so important for our students to take proactive steps to maximise their available income and minimise their outgoings to prioritise essential needs such as rent, utilities, food and travel.

"This joint campaign with our partners Consumer Council and Danske Bank to urge students to take notice of the dangers of gambling in all its forms comes at a very important time of the academic year and we hope it will make people stop and think of the dangers before they gamble online."

Ronan Convery from the Consumer Council, added: "If young people choose to game and gamble online, it is important that they do it safely and do not view it as a generator of income or a way to manage their money".