Northern Ireland news

Improving service for people with disabilities should `become part of businesses DNA'

Sarah Griffiths from Co Fermanagh was born with cerebral palsy and her parents were told she would never walk or talk

PURPLE Tuesday's focus on improving service for people with disabilities should `become part of the DNA' of the businesses from now on, according to an activist and mother-of-three.

The change programme for organisations of all sizes from all sectors with the common goal of improving the customer experience for disabled people 365 days a year took place yesterday.

Firms make public commitments - a minimum of one new activity or initiative - to ensure sustainable changes are made.

Among the businesses taking part was BT, with its social media advisor based in Enniskillen spearheading its contribution.

Sarah Griffiths from Co Fermanagh was born with cerebral palsy and her parents were told she would never walk or talk.

However, she overcame all obstacles in her way and recently received an MBE for her work as an advocate for people with disabilities.

Ms Griffiths, who has worked for BT since 2004, said the work has been "empowering" and has helped her find her voice.

"Creating a welcoming and empowering environment for all of our customers is key, including those who may need some extra care and support," she said.

"Through my personal, lived experience and my tenure as a customer service advisor; I strive to create an open, warm and respectful environment through all my interactions. I want everyone to feel, heard, understood, valued and supported.

"Purple Tuesday is just one of the many ways in which we can all come together to improve the experiences for our most vulnerable customers."

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