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BBC under pressure over lack of No Stone Unturned coverage

The documentary by Oscar-winning director Alex Gibney raised several key questions regarding the 1994 attack at The Height's Bar
Andrew Madden

THE BBC is facing pressure to clarify why it has failed to cover the release and fallout of the Loughinisland massacre documentary, No Stone Unturned.

Released earlier this month, the documentary by Oscar-winning director Alex Gibney raised several key questions regarding the 1994 attack at The Heights Bar in the Co Down village, which left six men dead.

The film suggested RUC Special Branch had prior knowledge of the attack and the director also took the decision to name the alleged gunman who carried out the atrocity.

Since its release, No Stone Unturned has sparked renewed interest in the case and has been covered extensively in the media.

However, Sinn Féin has expressed concern at the lack of coverage the film has received from the BBC since its release.

In a statement, Sinn Féin MP Chris Hazzard, who grew up close to the area where the atrocity happened, asked the BBC to clarify its reasoning behind its coverage of the documentary.

"People are genuinely dumbfounded that the BBC have not given this story the coverage that the vast majority of other media outlets have deemed worthy," he said.

"As the MP now for South Down I have asked the BBC to clarify its position urgently. Having covered the campaign for truth and justice for so many years, having interviewed family members and those injured in the attacks, why have they now all of sudden turned the spotlight off?''

In response, a BBC spokesperson said: "The tragedy of Loughinisland is a story BBC NI remains committed to covering and we will continue to make our own editorial judgments as to when we report any developments."

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