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TV Quickfire: Dan Walker reveals the content of new quiz show Chase The Case

New game show Chase The Case sees players answer questions to win visits to a secret vault, where they can learn about the contents of their opponents' cases. WE Quizzed presenter Dan Walker

BBC presenter Dan Walker is quizmaster of Chase The Case

CAN YOU SUM UP HOW CHASE THE CASE WORKS?

There are five cases – one's got the jackpot. Your job as a contestant is to, via your general knowledge, decipher where the dosh is and how to get it across the line before anyone else.

WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO PRESENT THE SHOW?

I hosted our first family quiz when I was seven. We're quite a big family, and so is my wife's, so still, even now, I'll play the question master. I get to be sport bloke, BBC Breakfast host man, and now I've got a game show as well.

YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE QUITE SO SERIOUS ON CHASE THE CASE. WAS THAT REFRESHING?

Oh yes. There's a time and a place for news. When you're presenting Breakfast and there's been – as there was 18 months ago – a horrible bomb in Manchester, there's a huge responsibility of delivering that news in the right way. But when you're hosting a game show, you can be far more relaxed and let your personality out a little bit.

DID ANYTHING EVER GO WRONG DURING FILMING?

I would say 25 of the hundred contestants couldn't open the case first time. At the end of the programme where we go, 'Let's see the value of the red case', or whatever colour it is, I had to go and help.

YOU SPENT FIVE WEEKS IN RUSSIA REPORTING FROM THE WORLD CUP. IS IT HARD BEING AWAY FROM HOME?

It's much easier for me because when I go away, I just work, so I just plough on and get through it. It's harder for my wife, my kids [he has three children, aged 11, nine and seven]. Professionally, it's amazing to be able to work on those tournaments but it does get hard because you feel like you just miss out on a lot of things, like birthdays and parties and performances and violin lessons...it's those little things, isn't it? But that's part of the job.

HOW DO YOU RELAX AWAY FROM FILMING?

We take the kids out cycling. If I'm relaxing myself, I love playing golf. I don't work Sundays so I always have Sundays at home. We go to church and spend that time as a family day.

MANY OF THE BBC BREAKFAST TEAM HAVE DONE STRICTLY COME DANCING. IS IT YOUR TURN NEXT YEAR?

I get stopped a lot saying, 'When are you doing it?' But you tell me where I could fit it in! I love the programme, we watch it with the children every weekend. But from my personal perspective, Strictly is best viewed from a distance. I'm not sure I want that level of intense scrutiny on everything.

WORKING FOR THE BBC MEANS THAT YOUR PAY IS PUBLIC. DO YOU THINK PAY TRANSPARENCY IS A GOOD THING?

Working for the BBC is brilliant, they're a fantastic organisation, and they provide value for money. But I'd be lying if I told you it's not awkward for people to know how much you earn. I'm proud of the fact that we do have equal pay at BBC Breakfast. I've always earned the same amount as Louise [Minchin]. The reason I'm higher up the [pay] list is because I've got two jobs.

WHAT ELSE HAVE YOU GOT LINED UP IN THE FUTURE?

I'm trying to factor in some sleep. The one thing Bill Turnbull told me when I took over from him on Breakfast: 'Dan, I don't want to give you any advice, all I would say is just manage your sleep'. And I've ignored him entirely.

:: Chase The Case starts today on BBC One.

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