Irish language

The Bluffer stands in line for his first pint after four dry months

BOOZE NEWS: The rise of the beer garden has been a phenomenon over the past decade or so but with only outdoor bevvies allowed at the minute, they are a Godsend to drinkers of all things from pints to cocktails 
Robert McMillen

GO mBEANNAÍ DIA daoibh, hello to the Bluffer’s Guide to Irish wherein you will get the chance to learn a little you need to know to chat about “an normaltacht úr” - the new normality.

On Friday, the Bluffer did something he swore he would never do - he queued to get into a bar.

Bhí sé i scuaine ar feadh 70 bomaite - he queued for 70 minutes to sit outside a city centre bar but because he was chatting with family members, the wait didn’t seem that long.

It was the same all through Belfast city centre and other places as well as Belfast went al fresco.

The day they opened, the Bluffer went to an gruagaire - the barber at 9am but bhí fiche duine sa scuaine - there were 20 people in the queue so he left it until Monday and got an immediate short back and sides. 

This week, it was the turn of the bars and restaurants to open for outside dining or bating pints into ye.

It is a monument to the hardiness of the citizens of this city that they are willing to sit in weather more suited to the tundra just to sink a few pints of Heverlee or Guinness amuigh faoin aer - outdoors.

Yesterday, bhí clocha sneachta ag titim go trom - there was a heavy downpour of hailstones where the Bluffer lives and he imagined the happy embibers ordering another pina colada in the wintry downpour - “no ice, thanks, I’ve already got hypothermia.” 

Still, bhí sceitimíní san aer - there was a buzz about the place that hasn’t been felt for a long time.

Some of the big shops opened too and the crowds outside Primark could have been directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

Tá na héadaí céanna á gcaitheamh agam le bliain - I’ve been wearing the same clothes for a year many people have been heard to say and as our lives start to look more like what it used to before the pandemic.

The Bluffer called into Debenham’s to pick up a sladmhargadh - a bargain or two.

It’s going to feel very odd and frankly depressing when all these huge siopaí na mórshráide - High street retailers close down and boards are put on their windows, a malaise no amount of street art can assuage. But it’s one of the many things we will just have to get used to.

Life is in constant flux and change and our mothers thought the first washing machine (with ringer) was the pinnacle of human achievement.

The guys or gals who invented the wheel must have thought themselves the height of sophistication. Things change, people adapt. 

Cheannaigh mé péire bróg inné - I bought a pair of shoes today and  they feel like they’re made of lead after a year of wearing bróga reatha - trainers.

The Bluffer even feels strange using airgead tirim - cash and counting out boinn - coins to pay for things is a skill he is going to have to re-learn unless the whole planet becomes contactless and money becomes just an idea in our heads – until you go into overdraft.

These are strange times for an cine daonna - the human race – so let’s all share a pint in the cold.

CÚPLA FOCAL

an normáltacht úr (un normaaltakht oor) - the new normality

bhí sé i scuaine ar feadh 70 bomaite (vee shay sa scooanya ar faow shakhto bumatcha) - he queued for 70 minutes 

an gruagaire (un grooagera) - the barber 

bhí fiche duine sa scuaine (vee feeha dinya sa scooanya) - there were 20 people in the queue

amuigh faoin aer (amwee fween ayr) - outdoors

bhí clocha sneachta ag titim go trom (vee clokha shnyakhta eg chitchim gaw trum) - there was a heavy downpour of hailstones 

bhí sceitimíní san aer (vee sketchimeenee san ayr) - there was a buzz about the place

Tá na héadaí céanna á gcaitheamh agam le bliain (taa na haydee keerna aa guyhoo ugum le bleean) - I’ve been wearing the same clothes for a year 

sladmhargadh (sladwaragoo) - a bargain

Cheannaigh mé péire bróg inné (kyanee may payra brawg inyay) - I bought a pair of shoes today 

bróga reatha (brawga raha) - trainers

siopaí na mórshráide (shupee na more-riyja) - High street retailers

airgead tirim (aragad chirim) - cash 

boinn  (bwin) - coins

an cine daonna (an kinya dayna) - the human race

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