Letters to the Editor

Joseph Goebbels's famous assertion still applies

On August 1 we were ‘treated’ to yet another anti-Catholic diatribe from Danny Treacy – ‘Catholic Church should listen to rapidly declining adherents’.

This gentleman seems to be obsessed with the Catholic Church, Hitler and Nazism.

If only someone could help him overcome his obsession then Mr Treacy might then be able to turn his ‘brilliant’ mind to addressing more pressing problems.

I am ready to do my little bit with a great deal of help from Alan Bullock, founding Master of  St Catherine’s College Oxford and his history Hitler and Stalin Parallel Lives.  

(Fontana Press P.232-240, 334-344).

Bullock tells us as the Nazi party vote rose exponentially in 1930 and 1932, the only party to hold its vote and indeed marginally increase it was the Catholic Centre Party.

Protestant pastors had urged their flocks to vote Nazi and Protestant woman came out in unprecedented numbers and did so. In no German state with a Catholic majority, including Bavaria did ever the Nazis get a majority of the vote. It was Protestant Germany led by Protestant Russia that ran Germany into Nazism and subsequently Germany, Europe and beyond into Armageddon.

He continues, the SA thugs who had been held on a light rein till the Nazis had their hands on levers of power as a ‘reward’ for their ‘loyal service’ were now let loose on the ‘traitors’ – communists, socialists, Jews, Catholic priests, politicians and journalists.

Protestant clergy were not included. They were seen as good guys who had urged their flocks to vote for the future Fuhrer.

Since war’s end commentators have waged a relentless propaganda war on the Church, particularly Pius XII, for signing the Concordat with the Nazis in 1933.

This they did to keep control of their schools and make life easier for their clergy and faithful in the Nazis cauldron their Protestant countrymen and women had done so much to bring about in 1932.  
In signing this notorious agreement they had no choice and were lucky getting what they got. It was all too late, the horse had bolted

Bullock states that within six months of Hitler being appointed chancellor the Nazi party was the only one in Germany and state and federal politics abolished and the Nazis made it clear they would tolerate no opposition.

German Protestants who were the majority 40 million to 20 million, believed that Hitler was the only man since Bismarck who could end the country’s decline, disunity and humiliation after 1918.

How then, contrary to the facts given by Professor Bullock are  the Catholics Nazi-loving bad guys?

Simple – black propaganda and Goebbels’s famous assertion – tell the lie big enough and often enough and people will believe it.

G SAVAGE
Newcastle, Co Down

 

If DUP had any principles it would sack Ian Paisley

The DUP have reluctantly suspended Ian Paisley for not declaring his lavish family holidays in Sri Lanka, as a guest of their government.

Ian Paisley was exposed by an investigative journalist for not declaring his expensive holidays to Sri Lanka, costing upwards of £100,000.
He was suspended by the Westminster parliament, which he had sworn to serve honourably. Fellow DUP MP Sammy Wilson took a principled stand with his colleague by saying: “We have had his apology and no sanctions should be imposed on him.”
Mr Wilson was not as forgiving with Sinn Féin MP Barry McElduff for playing a joke with a loaf of bread, demanding “he must go, and go now”.

Sri Lanka is a poor country and had the misfortune of being colonised by the brutal British Empire in 1815. It was known then as Ceylon. A nationalist political movement arose against the Empire in the 19th Century and obtained the country’s independence in 1948, it became a republic called Sri Lanka in 1972.

Following his five-star treatment in Sri Lanka, Ian Paisley had lobbied against international scrutiny of the Sri Lankan government’s brutal treatment of the Tamil people, including mass murder and genocide. In 2009, 50,000 people alone were slaughtered in the Jaffna Region. In 26 years of conflict upwards of 100,000 Tamils were murdered. These figures were convened by the UN secretary general Ban Ki Moon. However, the exact figures may never be known.

Ian Paisley should be ashamed of himself. If the DUP had any principles, they would send him on his way. I’m sure Sri Lanka would take him in.

FRANK GLYNN
Cricklewood, London 

 

Inward looking attitude will not wash

Trevor Ringland’s letter, ‘Hunger strikers bring to mind the Ulster expression ‘brave but stupid’ (August 3), is littered with errors regarding the 1981 hunger strike. 

The hunger strike was the culmination of a protest by republican prisoners against a criminalisation process by the British government of republicans. Loyalists in prison did not protest. The protest was undertaken by republicans who would refuse to wear criminal related clothing and said no to a British penal regime. A ‘no-wash’ protest was the next step. The hunger strike was not as Mr Ringland puts it, prisoners “starving themselves to death”. Those on that strike were not there to die. I’d say each and every one wanted to live, yet the determination was that they and their comrades were not, in prison jargon, “ordinary, decent criminals”.

He places responsibility for this awful episode on prisoners. He really hasn’t got it at this stage. Republicans are not ‘glassy eyed’. They are determined to see the integrity of the republican analysis through. Mr Ringland’s attitude [inward looking] will not wash.

MANUS McDAID
Derry City 

 

Importance of three words

Pope Francis in his address to families stressed the importance of three words – sorry, please and thank you.

As a people we could well use the same three words.

Not only sorry for the violence of the past, but sorry  for  our failure to bring about reconciliation and for the unwillingness of the politicians to compromise and to form a government.

The electorate should be sorry for continuing to vote for the extreme sectarian parties whom they know will not cooperate.

Please is for the politicians to end their stubbornness and to get the assembly working so we can have action on education, health, the environment and the arts and all the matters that affect our daily lives.

Then it would be great to be able to join together to say thank you.

MARGARET MARSHALL
Belfast BT8

 

Catholic Church is a church in crisis

Ireland is now seen as a ‘mission’ country.

Cultural Catholics feel exposed, angered, vulnerable and are breaking from the Church.

Committed Catholics are focusing minds and are re-energised at understanding their responsibility.

The core faithful must address sweeping secularisation, falling numbers and divisive media reporting. Abuse scandals must be investigated and victims must see the culpable punished and justice served.

Pressure from ordinary people can be applied for this to happen. The current crisis is also an opportunity.

It is a wake-up call to those who for many years had taken their Church and faith for granted.

Core Irish Catholic voices must be heard, in support of the Church, but also for immediate action on key issues.

It will be the core laity who will help bring renewal.

The laity is not for turning.

M CAIRNS
Belfast BT15

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